Tag: Glucose meter

Answers to test your knowledge

SUGER CUBE WITH GLASSES

1. 1923

2. Leonard Thompson

3. 2007

4. Type 1 diabetes

5. decrease in blood glucose level

6. A lack of insulin, fatty acids being burnt  and the production of ketones

7. 347 million however i think this number may have increased a little.

8.  Happiness

9. 1962 by Leland Clark and Champ Lyons

10.  With diabetes bad days are a part and parcel of the condition. I’ve learnt that I am able to overcome these bad days, sometimes with difficulty and sometimes with ease. Keeping a positive outlook about the condition and having strong support around me has really help me learn how to cope with these difficult moments.No matter what I always find a way to get through it. I won’t let myself be defeated!

No strips and expired strips!

As a T1D I know how important it is to have blood glucose strips which aren’t out of date, an expired strip could potentially give me the wrong blood glucose reading. Let’s face it that number that appears on the meter is so important, because as a diabetic I live by the numbers which appear on my meter. It allows me to confirm whether I have a low, high or a good blood glucose level (4-7 mmol/l).  Depending on what the outcome may be I can then act by either treating my low, high or just do nothing but record my level. Knowing my BGL’s are of great importance and it is just as significant as my insulin. My insulin and test strips are pivotal to me being able to manage my diabetes to the best standard possible. Unfortunately I can’t say that I’ve always had an abundant number of strips available or never been faced with expired test strips. I’d be lying if I said that has never happened to me.

That night I realised I used expired blood glucose strips……………..

I was woken one night because I just didn’t feel right. I felt as if my sugar was high. I reached for my blood glucose meter and realised I’d run out of strips. Actually I knew I didn’t have that many strips available the night before and had used the last one before bed. Therefore I checked in my usual back up strip storage places and couldn’t find a thing. My next move is always to go to my other blood glucose meters (x1) and see if there might be any strips in there. Yup I found nothing! So I decided to dig out some old meters (how I did this half asleep I do not know). By the way I have one really ancient meter with no battery and the other was the same as my (One touch Ultra Easy).

I opened up the case for the meter and (bling) I’ve never been so happy to see blood glucose strips and a full tub of 25 strips.  Without even looking at the expiry date I grabbed a strip, pricked my finger and tested my BGL.

HIGH

“WHATTTTTTTTTTTTTT?” OK I felt that way so at least I’m able to recognise my high symptoms.

I don’t know about any of the other T1D’s but the very few times I’ve had a reading that just says high or low on my meter, I totally freak out and want to correct it right then and there! I corrected it with a bolus and then I gave it 30 minutes to see if it would come down. I drank some water because strangely enough that seems to help too. Anyway finger prick number two, I expected the reading to be lower. My meter then produces another reading of

HIGH

“WHAT!! WHY HASN’T IT COME DOWN?”

I actually started to feel a lot better but then silly me instead of trusting how I was feeling.  I then corrected again! I waited another 30 minutes and at this point I started to feel a little low. It just made no sense. I then decided I’d go and wake my husband up who was actually already on his way to me.  I got him to test his BGL which read

HIGH

Side note: My husband isn’t a diabetic so really his BGL should have been within the norm.

I quickly checked the expiry date on the tub and saw that it was out of date by a year {{shock horror}} so all my readings had been incorrect to start with. I couldn’t do anything but at this point I felt as if my BGL was extremely low so I treated it slightly and waited until I felt OK. It was already morning I stayed awake and went to pick up my prescription as soon as the pharmacy opened.

My advice to all the diabetics who use test strips. Please make sure you have sufficient strips and strips which aren’t expired. This experience was extremely scary for me and an experience I’d rather not find myself in again. Having strips and strips that aren’t out of date is so crucial!

Has anyone else ever found themselves without strips or used expired strips without initially knowing? I’d love to hear your experiences.

Thanks Amina  xx

My first hypo!

PrintLet’s face it you can never really be ready for that first “hypo”. “What was to come?” Although I’d read about the symptoms, I could never have imagined the way it would affect me. I wasn’t really prepared for the feelings I was going to experience. The most frightening thing about it all was that I didn’t even realise, that I was already beginning to go through some of these symptoms. In all honesty, I wasn’t sure! I had nothing that I could measure against and confirm that it was a hypo.

This was my first hypo experience!

Initially I felt hungry. But I just thought, “maybe I was just hungry.” Lunch was nearly ready so I waited patiently. I didn’t feel that I needed to alert my mother. “was it a hypo, should I say something?”.  Believe it, or not, my first reaction wasn’t to go and check my BGL. Although you’d think “well why didn’t she just do that?”. But remember I was a child of 11 and this was the first big responsibility I had ever had. A responsibility which I was still familiarising myself  with. I can only put it down to my inexperience and being new to my diabetes.

Unknowingly as my symptoms progressed, I felt and realised, that these were some of the symptoms I’d read about, “Perhaps I was having a hypo”. I remember stumbling over to my mother, feeling very upset, sweating profusely and telling her, “I think I’m having a hypo.” Her reaction was instant. She sat me down, gave me a sweet drink, which I gulped down straight away. She seemed to be moving at the speed of lighting. She tested my BGL, and we both looked down in shock as my blood glucose meter read 2.1.  In my mind I thought, “is that right?”  At the time,  I just knew that this was way below the normal level.

I felt absolutely awful, I was unable to do much for myself. My clothes were soaked from sweating and for the first time in my life I felt so unlike myself. I was confused by what was happening to me and was unable to move as fast as I would like to.  I quickly ate the lunch my mother had prepared. It took a few minutes for the sweet drink and then the food to take effect and for me to feel a little like myself again. Coming out of the hypo my tongue tingled, my hands shook and I was really exhausted. In my mind I thought,

“So this is what a hypo is? I must have been hypo’in for a while!”

It was a scary thing to go through for first time.  I can only imagine what it was like for my mother watching me go through this first hypo.  Even now,  hypo’s can still be very worrying and scary. My first reaction to feeling hungry or dizzy,  is to test my BGL as soon as possible. This allows me to decide whether it’s my BGL or if I’m just hungry. It’s really important to recognise at least one of your symptoms. If you don’t have symptoms, keeping a close eye on your BGL ‘s  is the only way to do it. Teach the people around you,  and make them aware of your symptoms and how they can help you. I can’t stress how vital this is.

How to treat mild and severe hypo’s?

  • The first thing I usually reach for is  a bottle of Lucozade. But any energy drink  or sweet sugary drink is fine. I consume 50mls, which increases my BGL instantly. The great thing about Lucozade, is that it taste great, its easy to consume and they recently started doing more flavours.

lucozade

  • Although my BGL raises instantly, in order to keep it stable I frequently follow up with some form of carbohydrate i.e. a banana, a slice of bread, raisins or dates etc.
  • I’ll  check my BGL at least an hour after my hypo.

I always carry some form of sweet drink with me (usually Lucozade, as they come in a smaller bottle and are perfect for carrying in a bag). I will also keep some gluco tabs or gluco juice handy. GlucoTabs are fast acting chewable dextrose tablets, which contain 4g of glucose and can be used to treat mild hypo’s. They also come in two great flavours (orange and berry). Gluco juice is a caffeine free shot-sized sugar boost that can also help to treat mild or moderate hypo’s. Each bottle contains 60 mls of juice, containing 15g of fast acting carbohydrates.

When hypo symptoms persist and a person is either unable to treat themselves, or they are  unconscious. Glucagon injections are used to treat the severe hypoglycaemia. This is a hormone which helps to increase BGL. When glucagon is injected, it is absorbed into the blood stream. The glucagon moves to the liver and encourages the liver to release glucose into the blood. The effect of glucagon isn’t immediate, it usually takes between 10 -15 minutes to raise BGL’s back to a safe level. I’ve never had to use the glucagon injection, as my hypo’s have never been as severe as this. However I always keep a glucagon injection in the house, for when I might need it.

glycogon

Your views

What was your first hypo experience like? How do you treat yours? If you’re not diabetic, have you ever observed a diabetic during a hypo, or been involved in anyway to help them etc? Because I have no experience using the glucagon, what are your experience’s of using one?

x Amina

Test your sugar girl!

Blood glucose  levels = diabetes management

BE HEALTHY KNOW YOUR BGLA major aspect of being able to manage my diabetes is to regularly test my blood glucose levels. This involves inserting a test strip into a blood glucose machine, pricking my finger to draw blood and applying my blood to a test strip.

Testing blood glucose levels (BGL)  is a way for a diabetic to gauge what sort of  levels they are working with. For someone without diabetes this isn’t necessary,  as the body is able to keep the levels in a healthy range automatically. The body produces insulin and allows glucose to be released as energy.

What are the healthy ranges you ask?

In order for me to explain the levels a bit better. Please refer to my table below.

 Type Before Meal  2 hours After Meal
Non diabetic 4.0 – 5.9mmol/L Under 7.8 mmol/L
Type 1 4.0  -7.0mmol/L Under 9.0 mmol/L
Type 2 4.0 – 7.0mmol/L Under 8.5 mmol/L

For a person without diabetes, a normal blood glucose level usually ranges between 4.0mmol/l (72mg/dL)  – 6.1mmol/L (110mg/dL). After a meal, blood glucose levels may increase for a short period of time up to 7.8mmol/L (140mg/dL). With Type 1 diabetes there is the risk of blood glucose levels either raising (Hyperglycemia– this is when an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood) or dropping (Hypoglycemia – this is a  diminished amount of glucose in the blood.)

After years of testing, it’s something that you don’t really get use to. For me, it became something that I had to do, even though at times it can be painful, it can leave marks and has hardened my finger tips. The harsh reality is,  that it is a crucial part of being able to manage your diabetes.

How I manage my blood glucose levels

From the very beginning (at the age of 11), I tried as much as I could to take and record my BGL by myself. This was something which was encouraged during my time in the hospital and also at the diabetic clinic. However my parents supported me with this, but never pressured me. I felt comfortable to check my BGL and even inject in front of them and my siblings. They continued to except me for me, and never made me feel any different to them regardless of my condition.

Throughout my 19 years as a diabetic, I’ve gone through my fair share of blood glucose machines. There is such a wide variety of blood glucose machines out there. Most blood glucose machines work in the same way. In the sense that you get a blood sample and a blood glucose result in the end.My first blood glucose machine was big and bulky, required a large sample of blood and  took much longer to produce a blood glucose reading. I was advised by my diabetes team to test my glucose before and 2 hours after my main meals. My blood glucose levels (BGL) would then be recorded in a log book like this.

log book 3

The log book  allowed me to make notes of my insulin doses for that day, week etc. Also any general notes I wanted to jot down could be written in there. Now that I use an insulin pump my log books have changed and I tend to test a lot more frequently.

LOG BOOK

My blood glucose machines now are a lot more advanced and allow me to study the data a lot more closely. I enjoy formulating patterns and occurrences in blood glucose levels etc. (I think this is just the scientist in me). However, it does help me make changes or suggestions to my diabetic healthcare team during appointments.

The right machine

Here are the machines I’m using at the moment.

BGL MACHINE1

It’s always good to have a backup machine. Choosing the right machine is extremely important, because essentially it will allow you to know what is happening with your BGL and help  you to keep within a healthy range.  Personally, I prefer something that is small, easy to carry and requires a small blood sample.

Some insulin pumps, like the (Animas vibe) have the capability to continuously monitor blood glucose levels. These continuous CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitoring) glucose sensors are connected to the body and work with the insulin pump to retrieve blood glucose results. With the BGL’s retrieved, the CGM is able to formulate graphs. This comes in handy when it isn’t possible to test i.e. during the night, early morning, during a workout etc. The CGM is able to alert the user when blood glucose levels are increasing or decreasing. I hope to get my CGM sensor soon and will definitely share my experiences using one.