Tag: Finger prick

Diabetes Blog Week 2016 – Tips and Tricks

 

Since today Is the final day of the #DBlogWeek, I wanted to share some of the tips and tricks I use to not only keep my diabetes in check but  to keep going.

Positivity Tips and Tricks

Try, try, try and try again to do the best that you can do for yourself. You are worth it and you deserve to be ok. You can do things regardless of your condition. You are so much more.

Maya-Angelou

This beautiful quote by Maya Angelou really rings true for me. It is the way in which I have tried to do things in my life. Whether that be, my diabetes or even attempting new and challenging tasks. Whatever it may be, I always push to do that thing to the best of my capability. Especially, when it comes to diabetes, we have no choice but to try our best no matter how hard it may be. I’ve found that, it is within that struggle, that I am able to become much stronger, wiser, capable and ultimately more in control. From my diagnosis to now, this is how I’ve managed myself and my diabetes.  After all it is mine and no one else’s.

 Make a list of all the thing you want to achieve when it comes to being in control with diabetes. What do you want to achieve? It could be testing your BG more frequently, or working out more. Whatever it maybe, just write it down and keep striving to reach those goals. #Youcandothis

better-things

A little positivity goes a long way. You can read my post on ways to remain positive here

Finger Pricking good

image

So this is the state of my fingertips, after 21 years of BG testing. They are so hard and calloused that I’ve now taken to doing my finger prick in the palm of my hand. You know the meatier part of your hand. It’s great for getting enough blood each time I do it but it can be quite sensitive. The tip here is, you need to set your finger prick to a lower setting to avoid the constant flow of blood and try to alternate the sites you choose to prick.

For a good blood supply, wash your hands (wash your hands anyway to make sure you’re not testing that sticking jam you just touched) under warm water.

Working it out

trainners

When working out, you need to figure out when is the best time for you to actually workout. How is your BG affected at different times of the day? What does different types of exercise do to your BG levels?  A recent thing I learnt about myself and working out with diabetes is that morning times are one of the best times for me to do my workouts. This is usually in the form of some sort of cardio or HIT workout, before I consume any breakfast.

After a workout I usually follow with a breakfast which has some protein and carbs in it. There are many benefits to consuming carbs. One of which is, it helps to replenish the muscle glycogen that is burned during a workout. Carbs aren’t the enemy, everything in moderation is good!!

Food

I cook a lot, using fresh ingredients daily. It’s a good way of knowing exactly what you’re consuming.

When it comes to take outs, you don’t completely know what goes into the food and usually it causes huge spikes in my sugars.

If you’re not a great cook or you don’t have enough time, you could prepare your meals in advance for the week and freeze it.

The world is vast my friend, go out there and enjoy it!

DSC01106

Don’t panic!! You’re going on holiday for god sake. Relax and think about the holiday not just on your diabetes. Organise yourself and everything will be ok.

When you travel make sure you have a copy of your prescription with you, just in the unfortunate event that you lose your medication or you require more.

Before you fly, contact the airline and let them know that you are diabetic and will be carrying medication with you.

 DO NOT PUT ANY OF YOUR MEDICATION IN YOUR SUITE CASE, which will then goes into the hold. This could freeze your insulin and essentially spoil it. Always keep it with you.

Double up on the amount of supplies you may need and if you’re travelling with someone, then give them some of the supplies to hold for you.

If you’re a pump user, don’t forget to take a spare pump. Contact your provider at least a month in advance and they will provide you with a loaner pump, as well as a letter that states you’re a type 1 diabetic.

Remember to detach from your pump on take-off and landing, as the pressure in the cabin can cause insulin to be primed through the tubing and into you.

I would definitely recommend purchasing a FRIO bag to store your insulin in, it’s great. It keep the insulin at the right temperature.

Network and be happy

I’ve said it before, I’m going to say it again. Network with others, at your diabetes clinic, at different events, and of course online. It is a great way to connect with others people experiencing the same things you might be. It’s a fantastic form of support.

fighter

Keep on fighting, keep on smiling, and don’t give up. I know how difficult diabetes can be, but it isn’t impossible. Keep trying, keep track of it and with time you will make progress. Work hard and find the inner strength I know you have, to be able to take control of it and everything it comes with.

 shine

Amina xxx

Test your sugar girl!

Blood glucose  levels = diabetes management

BE HEALTHY KNOW YOUR BGLA major aspect of being able to manage my diabetes is to regularly test my blood glucose levels. This involves inserting a test strip into a blood glucose machine, pricking my finger to draw blood and applying my blood to a test strip.

Testing blood glucose levels (BGL)  is a way for a diabetic to gauge what sort of  levels they are working with. For someone without diabetes this isn’t necessary,  as the body is able to keep the levels in a healthy range automatically. The body produces insulin and allows glucose to be released as energy.

What are the healthy ranges you ask?

In order for me to explain the levels a bit better. Please refer to my table below.

 Type Before Meal  2 hours After Meal
Non diabetic 4.0 – 5.9mmol/L Under 7.8 mmol/L
Type 1 4.0  -7.0mmol/L Under 9.0 mmol/L
Type 2 4.0 – 7.0mmol/L Under 8.5 mmol/L

For a person without diabetes, a normal blood glucose level usually ranges between 4.0mmol/l (72mg/dL)  – 6.1mmol/L (110mg/dL). After a meal, blood glucose levels may increase for a short period of time up to 7.8mmol/L (140mg/dL). With Type 1 diabetes there is the risk of blood glucose levels either raising (Hyperglycemia– this is when an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood) or dropping (Hypoglycemia – this is a  diminished amount of glucose in the blood.)

After years of testing, it’s something that you don’t really get use to. For me, it became something that I had to do, even though at times it can be painful, it can leave marks and has hardened my finger tips. The harsh reality is,  that it is a crucial part of being able to manage your diabetes.

How I manage my blood glucose levels

From the very beginning (at the age of 11), I tried as much as I could to take and record my BGL by myself. This was something which was encouraged during my time in the hospital and also at the diabetic clinic. However my parents supported me with this, but never pressured me. I felt comfortable to check my BGL and even inject in front of them and my siblings. They continued to except me for me, and never made me feel any different to them regardless of my condition.

Throughout my 19 years as a diabetic, I’ve gone through my fair share of blood glucose machines. There is such a wide variety of blood glucose machines out there. Most blood glucose machines work in the same way. In the sense that you get a blood sample and a blood glucose result in the end.My first blood glucose machine was big and bulky, required a large sample of blood and  took much longer to produce a blood glucose reading. I was advised by my diabetes team to test my glucose before and 2 hours after my main meals. My blood glucose levels (BGL) would then be recorded in a log book like this.

log book 3

The log book  allowed me to make notes of my insulin doses for that day, week etc. Also any general notes I wanted to jot down could be written in there. Now that I use an insulin pump my log books have changed and I tend to test a lot more frequently.

LOG BOOK

My blood glucose machines now are a lot more advanced and allow me to study the data a lot more closely. I enjoy formulating patterns and occurrences in blood glucose levels etc. (I think this is just the scientist in me). However, it does help me make changes or suggestions to my diabetic healthcare team during appointments.

The right machine

Here are the machines I’m using at the moment.

BGL MACHINE1

It’s always good to have a backup machine. Choosing the right machine is extremely important, because essentially it will allow you to know what is happening with your BGL and help  you to keep within a healthy range.  Personally, I prefer something that is small, easy to carry and requires a small blood sample.

Some insulin pumps, like the (Animas vibe) have the capability to continuously monitor blood glucose levels. These continuous CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitoring) glucose sensors are connected to the body and work with the insulin pump to retrieve blood glucose results. With the BGL’s retrieved, the CGM is able to formulate graphs. This comes in handy when it isn’t possible to test i.e. during the night, early morning, during a workout etc. The CGM is able to alert the user when blood glucose levels are increasing or decreasing. I hope to get my CGM sensor soon and will definitely share my experiences using one.