Tag: One touch verioQ

Let them in!

How do you even begin to explain to your children, what diabetes is? It’s extremely important for them to know, but how much is enough?

My eldest has always been curious about my diabetes and all the technology I am so lucky to have. Isasmiling

He has many interesting questions;

“Mami, How’s does my body know how to produce insulin and yours doesn’t?
“What is Insulin?”
“What does insulin do?”
“When your sugar goes too high, what’s happening inside your body?”
“How does my body know when to stop giving me insulin, when I’ve eaten something?”

Which really helps me explain diabetes better and with ease. I try my best to answer his questions, as simply as I possibly can. Confusion and worry is the last thing you want, especially when you’re trying to enlighten a 6 year old about diabetes. Now I’ve come to think about it, I wouldn’t want to confuse anyone. There’s already enough confusion when it comes diabetes.

It’s not an easy job, but who said it was going to be? The fact that he is even asking, shows me that he has an interest in what is happening with me, me, his mother.

The way I look at it is, his questions are an opening, an opportunity for me to show him this side of me. He’s at that age, where he questions everything. He wants to know more. The short answer isn’t good enough. He wants to know every last detail. However, I still approach the ‘diabetes’ subject in a gentle way.

He’s observed me countless times changing my insert and knows that when I prick my finger, I’m in fact checking my sugar level. He’ll watch and wait for the numbers, close his eyes and say, “I really hope it’s a good number mami.” (Heart break) He now also knows that I’m looking for the best number range to appear on the screen of my BG meter.

What truly amazed me the other day, was when I was having a hypo. I made mention that I was feeling hungry, so he asked me if I wanted him to get my BG meter so I could test my level. So I said, “Yes ok”. I pricked my finger, applied the blood to the strip and he wait to see what it read. It was 4.2 and most likely on its way down, considering the way I was starting to feel. Before I could even get up, he’d ran to the kitchen and brought back a box of juice from my goody draw and said, “Here you go mami.”

Recently, he asked me if he could test his BG level, which totally blew me away. He is a very sensitive soul and extremely squeamish when it comes to cuts and blood, so I was shocked that he even asked. Of course, I completely jumped on this opportunity to explain to him what was required to test a BG level. Then, I asked him if he was ready he said, yes. I pricked him, he flinched a little bit and then smiled. We quickly put the blood on the test strip and he waited with excitement to see what numbers would appear.

Isabgtesting

I praised him for being such a brave boy and he responded with, “mami, I don’t know how you do this every day.” I smiled at him, trying not to cry up a storm and I just explained to him that it was something that I had to do. Just like sleeping and eating, are the things we all need to do. He replied with, “but this is harder and you’re very brave mami.” (Heartbreak)

 

Now my 2 year old, as young as that might seem has also started to develop a very basic understanding of me having to always check my BG levels and change my insert. From the moment she was born, she’s been observing me, pricking my fingers and most likely hearing the familiar beeping sounds, being emitted from my pump.Untitled-3

Her favourite kiddie show is doc Mc stuffin’s and there’s a theme song. “Time for your check-up”. How do I explain this, she’s a child, who plays a doctor who fixes broken toys by finding a diagnosis. Yes I watch it too hahaha!

Moving on……

This morning, she ran to find my BG meter and reminded me, that I needed to do have a check-up. I laughed! She stood there with a huge smile on her face, while waiting eagerly for me to do it. Usually, when she sees blood she’ll say, “Ouch!” However, this time she just watched. Another thing she has taken to doing is, asking me if I’ve done a check-up when were sat down to a meal. When this happened for the first time, I realised that she had made the connection between me eating and testing my BG.

See already her understanding is developing!

They both amaze me because they aren’t frightened to be around my diabetes. It’s become quite normal for them to see me change my insert or test my BG. They have the understanding that it is a part of me and I think that they are alright with that. As they mature, they’ll develop a further understanding and in turn they will have a better understanding of my daily lifestyle.

isaandsusu

Word of advice….

If your children are asking you about your diabetes, don’t be afraid to explain it to them. Be open and honest with them, let them in. You’re important to them, if not one of the most important things in their lives. Even if they aren’t asking questions, you can always start by mentioning little things, giving them snippets of your life.

diabetesluvones

Although, this is an experience about me and my family, this can be related to anyone in any relationship. If they are asking questions, answer them as simply as you can. Once you’ve opened that door of conversation, the questions will come thick and fast. But don’t panic! Don’t give too much detail at once and scare them to death. Stay positive when expressing things to them, which will allow them to absorb the information with confidence and know that things are ok with you. Diabetes awareness starts at home. Just think the knowledge you pass on to your loved ones, could potentially help another person in the future.

Please comment below and let me know your stories and how you’ve explained ‘diabetes’ to your loved ones?

Amina xx

A BS kinda day!

*BS  as in  Blood  Sugars*

Unless you are a diabetic or a person who has a loved one who suffers from diabetes, you may have no idea what diabetes is all about. How constant it is and in actual fact, how life threatening it can be. It is a hard condition to manage and you may not even consider the daily vigilance an individual needs to have, in order to keep a tight reign on their blood glucose levels.

I thought the best way to develop an understanding of what day to day living with diabetes can be like, was to give you a glimpse into the sort of days I can have. Every day is unpredictable.

SHSL-BLOOD-SUGARS

So here goes

December 15th–  I decided to pick a random crazy day, so you can truly see how up and down sugars can be. The day starts with the night of the 14th.

 10:37pm – Blood sugar reading – 6.5mmol/l 

The perfect Blood sugar reading to go to bed with. After a heavy pasta dinner that night, I’m pleasantly surprised. I usually aim for a BS between 6.5 -7 mmol/l  before heading off to bed.  Although 6.5mmol was a great reading, it’s become a habit to always make sure that i’m prepared for any lows in the night. It saves me from having to make that journey down the stairs, or disturbing my husband. Although he say’s,  “he doesn’t mind”. I sometimes feel bad that I’m disturbing his sleep too, but if I really can’t make it I do ask him.

Nighttimehypo

I head off to bed and a few hours later I reach a point in my sleep, where I’m fighting to open my eyes. I’m using every last bit of energy I have to try and get myself up. It isn’t just the feeling of being tired and not wanting to open your eyes. It’s a real struggle, one which means your draining every last bit of energy you have in your body. I tend to have this feeling, when I’m hypoing, but you can never be too sure so I decided to check my blood sugar level.

02.36 am – Reaching for my blood glucose meter I feel very weak. My pj top is soaked. It’s definitely a hypo. Thank god I brought up all those goodies the night before. I check my sugar level and low and behold, I’m having a pretty low low.

Blood sugar reading – 3.4mmol/l

To correct my low blood sugars I usually give myself  15g of fast acting carbs. This usually comes in the form of Lucozade (which by the way isn’t so great in the early hours of the morning).

But this is diabetes, being forced to wake up in the middle of the night to eat or drink something, when all you want to do is sleep. I dare not just go back to sleep!

So, after having my Lucozade I waited 15 minutes, I sat on the edge of my bed in my sweaty pjs. NICE! I watched the time as it ticked by slowly.

The thing about hypo’s are, they can make you feel quite ravenous.  In that momment, you’d do anything to get back to feeling more like your usual self again. Knowing that the food consumed will allow me to return to this normal state, sometimes I am guilty of consuming more than the 15g and waiting for my BS to increase.

Resisting an over correction is one thing but on that night I found I wasn’t able to wait the full 15 mins without checking my BS level again. 7 minutes later, at 2.43 am, when I tested my BS I got a reading of   3.4 mmol/l. Hmmm it hasn’t budged yet!!!

Do I wait till I reach the 15 Mins?

Nope!  I go straight for the apple and satsuma.

02.55 am  – And  yes I’ve  finishedboth fruits in record time. BS reading  is now 4.0 mmol.l. Great finally its starting to come up! I wait a little bit longer and test my BS at 3.30am 5.0 mmols/l. Maybe I was safe to go back to sleep now. At this point I’m feeling even more exhausted than ever.  In a sitting position I rest my head against the headboard and fall into a very deep sleep, until my alarm goes off at 6.30am.

 

07.31 am – BS reading before breakfast 6.0mmol/l

  

The rest of the day went a little something like this….

13.09 BS reading before Lunch

17.10 BS reading before dinner

22.32 BS reading a few hours after dinner.

This was definitely a rebound BS.

*Rebound otherwise known as the Somogyi phenomenon. This sometimes occur when the BS level drops very low and then rebounds very high, causing a high BS level.*

I’m happy to report that after a crazy couple of hours my sugar settled and fell more in the normal range again. PHEW! So just remember, the next time you see me looking all tired, or I make mention of feeling exhausted. It’s possible that I had a crazy night like this one.

Thanks for stopping by  Amina x