Tag: low carb diet

Carbs & Cals have a new Salad book

salad book cover

Cook book: Carbs & Cals Salads by Chris Cheyette & Yello Balolia

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app

Overview: Carb counting is so important for us (diabetics) as we must constantly be vigilant of what we are putting into our bodies. I’ve been a huge fan of Carbs and Cals and have been using their app for many years now. I found that the app really helped me to understand how many carbs I was consuming daily whilst understanding how it affected my blood glucose levels. On the app you can search for different foods types which have been measured out into different portions. It breaks down the amounts of carbohydrates, proteins, calories and fats within certain foods. It also contains a calendar which allows you to input your exercise routine and all foods you consume.

A few weeks ago, I was given the opportunity to review the Carbs & Cals new Salad book and of course I was delighted to review it and try out some of their new recipes. If you’re new to carb counting, you can really begin to develop a stronger understanding of how many carbohydrates you are having from meal to meal. Life is definitely made a lot easier because like the app you’re getting a much better understanding of what you are putting into your body and for those of us who still like to flick through the pages of a book the Carbs & Cals Counter , Salad and Smoothie books are all great additions to have alongside other cookery books.

If you are thinking of incorporating more salads into your diet, then the healthy new salad book gives you so many fantastic ideas to create new recipes, whilst exploring delicious ingredients filled with so many health benefits. The Salad book provides the option of both hot and cold salads.  If you’re looking for salads which are higher in fibre, protein or if you’re pursuing a low carb diet then there are many options to try out.

At the start of each year, people make promises to work out and lose a few pounds here and there. Well, I decided that this year I was going to try and get rid of some of the extra mama pounds I’d gained during and after my pregnancies. I wanted to maintain a regular fitness routine and improve my diet as a whole. Previously, I’d only eaten salads alongside my main meals but with this book I’ve been able to incorporate gains (which are more filling) into my salads, allowing me to have salads as a main dish.

Recipe I tried:

King Prawn & Avocardo – which can be found in the Low carb section of the book (P.34)

 

Cooking from Carb & Cals Salad book

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The King Prawn & Avocado recipe has ingredients that I was familiar with, although I have never used pineapple in my salad before. It was surprisingly really nice. The recipe suggests that, “the sweet pineapple and salty olives make for a great combination”. The salty olives mixed with the sweet pineapple flavour really worked well. 

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The recipe is very easy to make and follow plus the ingredients weren’t costly. I also added the olive oil and lemon dressing which made it taste delicious. It gives you the option to leave off the dressing (saving you 35 Cals and 4g of fat) but I think the flavours it adds makes the salad even better. The recipe was very filling so I shared the remaing with my family, who also enjoyed it very much.

So here’s the full recipe for you to try out

12-May-king-prawn-avacado

My favourite parts of ‘Carbs & Cals Salad’ are the colour coded sections at the top of each page, which divides the book up into different salad recipes, categorised by salad dietary types. The very back section of this book outlines the different portions of vegetables, fruits, meats, cheeses, nuts, seeds and even grains like pasta that can be included into whatever salad/s you choose to make or create.

Just like the app and the Cabs & Cals counter book, carbohydrates, calories and fat contents are all clearly shown in colour coded circles. I love it! Your eyes are automatically drawn to these circles and you begin to recognise the carbs, cals etc, instantly when you turn to each page.

I’m so excited to give some of the other recipes in this book a try and even create my own salad recipes using the portion section at the back of the book. I will be able to develop an even better understanding of the carbs, cals etc content in different foods. My son has already requested a few of the salads, so I’ll be making many more salads from my new favourite recipe book. Thanks Carbs and Cals.

You can follow Carbs & Cals on instagram, twitter and their website.

You can also follow me on twitter, instagram and facebook.

Amina xx

Type 1 diabetic on Metformin

metformin extraType 1 diabetic? CHECK

Insulin dependent? CHECK 

Taking Metformin?  ERR CHECK

Yup your vision isn’t failing you. I’m a type 1 diabetic on Metformin. I started to take metformin over 4 years ago alongside my insulin pump therapy. I began to notice that my insulin basal doses seemed to be increasing steadily on a monthly basis. In fact my basal doses had more than doubled over a course of 4 months.

So what is Metformin?

Metformin – is a drug, which is usually used to treat type 2 diabetics.  It is commonly given to type 2 patients who are overweight, obese and with normal kidney function. It is also used to treat gestational diabetes and polycystic ovaries.

“So why do I take it?”Metformin1

I wasn’t overweight or obese and I maintained a good healthy weight for several years. So why did I need it all of a sudden?  It just made no sense at all. Being the scientist that I am, I started to look for different research papers which might be related to metformin and type 1 diabetes.  A lot of the papers I came across only made mention of type 2 diabetics taking this drug due to insulin resistance.

Wikipedia states that, Insulin resistance (IR) is a physiological condition in which cells fail to respond to the normal actions of the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin, but the cells in the body become resistant to insulin (through changes in their surface receptors) and are unable to use it as effectively. Beta cells in the pancreas increase their production of insulin, further contributing to hyperglycaemia. This often remains undetected and can contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes.

Could it be that I’d developed some sort of insulin resistance specific to type 1 diabetes? HMMMM!! As I delved deeper, I came across a paper which talked about insulin resistance occurring in type 1 diabetics.  Just like type 2 diabetics, type 1 diabetics are also known to suffer from insulin resistance. Metformin had been mentioned as a drug which was able to lower the amount of insulin required, by helping the body move and use the insulin more efficiently.

So maybe in my case the insulin from my insulin pump wasn’t being used and moved around my body efficiently!

I decided to make an appointment to see both my diabetic doctor and nurse to see what they thought, without telling them the extensive research I’d done. After a lengthy conversation they also came to the conclusion I might be Insulin resistant and suggested that I try Metformin. They explained all the past and recent research done, the success people with both type 1 and 2 diabetes have experienced with this drug.

So I thought,” why not, what’s the worst that can happen?”

Initially, I started to take (500mg metformin, prolonged release tablets), once a day with my evening meal. Almost instantly I noticed that the amount of insulin I had needed prior to metformin began to reduce. I was then advised to increase my dose to (500mg prolonged release twice a day) with my evening meal.

I started to experience different side effects. Some of the good side effects were, my HbA1c dropped from 7.9% to 7.0%. I dropped a few pounds and my insulin requirement continued to decrease drastically. Some of the unpleasant side effects were, severe abdominal pain followed by gas and severe upset stomach, which would then settle after 24 – 48 hours. Later I realised that this was down to sometimes forgetting to take my tablet. So if you make the decision to take metformin, remember not to skip your dose.

I began to think this drug really was amazing! It was reducing my insulin intake, my HbA1c was fantastic and I was in even greater shape than I was before. This all became extremely important because my husband and I had made the decision to try to conceive. When I finally conceived, I continued to take metformin for the first 4 months of my pregnancy. I then stopped taking it completely until nearly a year after my pregnancy. I’ll go further into this when I do my post on diabetes and pregnancy.

As a type 1 diabetic, if you’re considering metformin, I’d definitely recommend talking to your doctor first. “Do your own research, prepare questions to ask your doctor. Be prepared!” After all it is your body. You must remember that, we all react to medication in different ways and you may or may not have the same results that I did. However, I strongly feel that the metformin played a great part in reducing my HbA1c and also more than halving my insulin basal dose. Perhaps the metformin combined with other factors such as eating a low carb diet, exercising and eating healthily, which I was doing prior to taking metformin helped to achieve good results with the drug.