Tag: diabetes and pregnancy

Life’s Blessings

So let me start by apologising to my readers for being away from my blog for the past few months. A lot has happened since I last posted but i’m back and I hope to be posting more frequently.

Life is amazing and can take you on so many different paths.  My life took a turn and I was very blessed to have a healthy baby girl

mami susu handSumayah sleeping

As you may or may not know diabetes and pregnancy is not so straight forwards. Diabetes is constant, twenty four seven, seven days a week, three hundred and sixty five days a year and every single second of the day. There’s no break! Now let’s throw pregnancy into the mix. Every worry, stress, discomfort and anxiety I have with just the diabetes alone was trebled. I no longer just had the responsibility of just managing myself and my diabetes. I was now caring for this precious life growing inside me. This gift which was now my responsibility. On top of all of this I also had to make sure my four year old son was cared for and entertained.

Although this was my second pregnancy, it was completely different to my first. In terms of how my sugars behaved, my insulin requirement during the pregnancy etc.  With my first pregnancy I definitely stressed myself out mainly due to blood sugar levels and I found that this time it was no different.  I think it’s a natural feeling to have in the beginning considering how important this journey is.

I’ve learnt to think of it in this way. I have to be able to create the best environment, the best condition for my baby to have the best start in life. Good sugars, good control, being vigilant, being involved in this whole process from the beginning to end and a lot of prays equals a healthy baby. God willing.

I also realised that even though stress is a part and parcel of the pregnancy it is still crucial not to let the stress take over completely. Stress can definitely interfere with sugar levels and I know that all too well. I had to remind myself of this and although still being vigilant I also had to let go of the worry a little and leave it in god’s hands.

beachThanks to my brother for sending me this picture during my pregnancy of his trip to Mexico. It was a great de stress tool. Also long deep breaths and sleep when I could fit it in.

 

I can honestly say that this pregnancy journey was extremely challenging. However the end result makes every emotion I felt, every difficulty I went through worth it. To all the D mums currently on this journey or about to start this journey. Be patient, stay strong and be positive. Try your best and remain stress free.

 

 

Amina xxx

What is it about coffee?

Kaffee

© ram69 – Fotolia.com

Coffee  커피  قهوة  café Kaffee コー​​ヒー

Is coffee good or bad for diabetes? Hmmm!! This is a question I‘ve been asking myself ever since my blood glucose levels (BGL) started to wreak havoc.

As a child coffee was always painted in such poor light. It was something I was never allowed to have. I was told it would stunt my growth and that it was really bad for me. All the adults around me were drinking it so why was it such a bad thing? The smell it produced was amazing, it made me curious. “What was it like? Why was it so bad for me?” What made even less sense was that I was allowed to have milky tea, which made me happy because all the adults were drinking it too.

Side note: I also love a good cup of tea. Tea however doesn’t seem to affect me in the same way that coffee does.

As I grew I started to drink coffee, I’d drink one or two cups every week. I loved a good cup of coffee. It didn’t hurt me or affect my diabetes in anyway so I continued to drink it. Since I married my husband (who is a mega coffee drinker), I’ve drastically increased my consumption. My one to two cups every week increased to two to three cups in a day “shaking my head”. But I “love” coffee!!! Recently I began to realise that maybe coffee doesn’t love me back.

Every time I’d drink a cup of coffee I noticed that it increased my BGL with no sign of coming down. Also if I ever ate after consuming a cup of coffee my BGL’s would increase even more, forcing me to correct it with a bolus (insulin correction) to bring it back down.

I decided to do some reading about coffee and its possible effects on type 1 diabetes. A lot of the articles and papers I read were very confusing. Some of the articles would express how beneficial coffee was to diabetes and other articles would point out all the wrongs with coffee and diabetes. I think the reason for this conflicting information is because, coffee contains several types of chemicals and some of these chemicals are beneficial whilst others potentially aren’t. This is due to the fact that caffeine is able to impair insulin sensitivity.  In a person with type 2 diabetes this will increase BGL slightly, however with a type 1 diabetic BGL will increase a great deal and will require a bolus to reduce BGL.

FYI: coffee has many benefits it contains polyphenols which have been known to prevent illnesses such as type 2 diabetes. It also contains many nutrients such as magnesium and chromium. The nutrients have been known to improve insulin sensitivity. (Note to self I better get some magnesium and chromium supplements)

According to 2011 “Breast Cancer Research” studies show that coffee contains numerous phytoestrogens, which are chemicals found in plants that sometimes act like the hormone estrogen in your body. The role that phytoestrogens play in your body varies, however, with some mimicking estrogen and having the same effects as this hormone and others blocking estrogen’s effects. Coffee appears to have both varieties and factors like its preparation method, filtering or boiling may influence how much of each type you take.

After all my reading, I made the decision to give the coffee a break and do a detox (I will do a more detailed post on my detox in the future), to cleanse my system and also to truly find out if it was the coffee that was affecting my blood glucose levels. I actually stayed away from all caffeine during the detox, so no tea as well. During the detox my BGL remained stable (no crazy lows or highs).  After two weeks of detoxing I slowly reintroduce the tea first and my BGL continued to act as it did during the detox.

I then reintroduced the coffee to see what would happen. I decided to only consume 1 cup of coffee every day in the morning. The first 2 days of drinking the coffee caused my BGL to rise beyond belief.  I would always have to correct with a bolus.

Was this the end of my coffee drinking days? L

I did some more reading and found a few articles which mentioned that a regular high caffeine intake has been linked to better insulin sensitivity. I decided although my BGL had been rising, that I would increase my consumption to 2 cups a day.

Day 3, the strangest thing happened. That morning I started my day with my usual routine of BGL check (7.2mmol/l) and my usual cup of coffee. I then checked my BG after an hour and to my surprise my BGL was within the normal range (4mmol/l – 7mmol/l). What did I do differently? Nothing at all!

My BGL continued to stay in the normal range so I had my second cup of coffee that evening.

Then day 5, my BGL started off in the normal range and then they began to drop almost after every meal. I struggled to get them up and it took a lot of glucose/carbohydrate consumption to get it within a normal range.  Day 6 and 7 were pretty much the same. I had to have my emergency hypo kit to hand all the time.

Week 2, I decided I would go back to having my 1 cup of coffee, once a day in the evening. This seemed to slow down the hypos. I guess that everything in moderation saying does work out after all.

Another side track: I then found out I was pregnant and I completely stopped drinking coffee all together. After my little peanut arrived I made the decision to breast feed so I stayed away from coffee for almost a year. Plus the pregnancy and breast feeding brought a whole new set of hypo issues. My insulin sensitivity increased so much that my rates were nearly zero. My I: C (insulin to carb ratios increased) and ISF (Insulin sensitivity factor decreased), but I was still having hypos especially in the night. Naughty me I admit I even detached from my pump at times. As a matter of a fact even after the pregnancy my BGL’s lean towards the lower side. This is something that I’m working on with my diabetic team.

To answer my initial question, is coffee good or bad for diabetes?

I definitely think that coffee has an effect on BGL’s. In my case too much coffee increased my BGLs. After the detox and reintroduction of coffee my BGLs still seemed to rise. An Increased consumption of coffee resulted in a decrease in my BGL’s.  However I feel that the pregnancy may have been playing a big part in it all.

After a few years I’m now back to drinking coffee and I try to limit it to 2 cups in a week or less. I do find that on the days I drink coffee my BGL can drop  especially in the night. This month I’ve been really good and so far only had 4 cups. I don’t think I’ll ever totally give up on coffee but I will definitely moderate the amount of coffee I’m pumping into my body since it seems to have some sort of effect on my BGLs. Overall my nocturnal hypos have decreased.

Does coffee affect anyone else in this strange way or any other strange way? Diabetic or non-diabetic. Or is it just me? Hahaha

 

Type 1 diabetic on Metformin

metformin extraType 1 diabetic? CHECK

Insulin dependent? CHECK 

Taking Metformin?  ERR CHECK

Yup your vision isn’t failing you. I’m a type 1 diabetic on Metformin. I started to take metformin over 4 years ago alongside my insulin pump therapy. I began to notice that my insulin basal doses seemed to be increasing steadily on a monthly basis. In fact my basal doses had more than doubled over a course of 4 months.

So what is Metformin?

Metformin – is a drug, which is usually used to treat type 2 diabetics.  It is commonly given to type 2 patients who are overweight, obese and with normal kidney function. It is also used to treat gestational diabetes and polycystic ovaries.

“So why do I take it?”Metformin1

I wasn’t overweight or obese and I maintained a good healthy weight for several years. So why did I need it all of a sudden?  It just made no sense at all. Being the scientist that I am, I started to look for different research papers which might be related to metformin and type 1 diabetes.  A lot of the papers I came across only made mention of type 2 diabetics taking this drug due to insulin resistance.

Wikipedia states that, Insulin resistance (IR) is a physiological condition in which cells fail to respond to the normal actions of the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin, but the cells in the body become resistant to insulin (through changes in their surface receptors) and are unable to use it as effectively. Beta cells in the pancreas increase their production of insulin, further contributing to hyperglycaemia. This often remains undetected and can contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes.

Could it be that I’d developed some sort of insulin resistance specific to type 1 diabetes? HMMMM!! As I delved deeper, I came across a paper which talked about insulin resistance occurring in type 1 diabetics.  Just like type 2 diabetics, type 1 diabetics are also known to suffer from insulin resistance. Metformin had been mentioned as a drug which was able to lower the amount of insulin required, by helping the body move and use the insulin more efficiently.

So maybe in my case the insulin from my insulin pump wasn’t being used and moved around my body efficiently!

I decided to make an appointment to see both my diabetic doctor and nurse to see what they thought, without telling them the extensive research I’d done. After a lengthy conversation they also came to the conclusion I might be Insulin resistant and suggested that I try Metformin. They explained all the past and recent research done, the success people with both type 1 and 2 diabetes have experienced with this drug.

So I thought,” why not, what’s the worst that can happen?”

Initially, I started to take (500mg metformin, prolonged release tablets), once a day with my evening meal. Almost instantly I noticed that the amount of insulin I had needed prior to metformin began to reduce. I was then advised to increase my dose to (500mg prolonged release twice a day) with my evening meal.

I started to experience different side effects. Some of the good side effects were, my HbA1c dropped from 7.9% to 7.0%. I dropped a few pounds and my insulin requirement continued to decrease drastically. Some of the unpleasant side effects were, severe abdominal pain followed by gas and severe upset stomach, which would then settle after 24 – 48 hours. Later I realised that this was down to sometimes forgetting to take my tablet. So if you make the decision to take metformin, remember not to skip your dose.

I began to think this drug really was amazing! It was reducing my insulin intake, my HbA1c was fantastic and I was in even greater shape than I was before. This all became extremely important because my husband and I had made the decision to try to conceive. When I finally conceived, I continued to take metformin for the first 4 months of my pregnancy. I then stopped taking it completely until nearly a year after my pregnancy. I’ll go further into this when I do my post on diabetes and pregnancy.

As a type 1 diabetic, if you’re considering metformin, I’d definitely recommend talking to your doctor first. “Do your own research, prepare questions to ask your doctor. Be prepared!” After all it is your body. You must remember that, we all react to medication in different ways and you may or may not have the same results that I did. However, I strongly feel that the metformin played a great part in reducing my HbA1c and also more than halving my insulin basal dose. Perhaps the metformin combined with other factors such as eating a low carb diet, exercising and eating healthily, which I was doing prior to taking metformin helped to achieve good results with the drug.