Tag: Animas

Whatever Next?

Hacking is something that has been in existence since the introduction of the first computer. In fact, it has been around for many centuries. As we’ve had more advances in technology, many hackers have also developed and broadened their hacking skills and techniques enabling them to target larger companies. They have even been able to access people’s private information, stealing it and sharing it with the world. Recently, Talk Talk Business were affected by hackers. Over 157 000 of their customers, information was accessed.

 There are now mounting concerns over the threat of medical devices being hacked. Kaspersky Lab a security firm announced in February 2016 of their success in hacking into a hospital’s I.T infrastructure, which gave them full access to the hospital’s MRI device (magnetic resonance imaging).

The pharmaceutical company, Johnson and Johnson, who produce many types of insulin pumps, from the Animas Vibe, The One Touch Ping and the 20/20, have recently warned that one of its pumps, The One Touch Ping is at risk of being hacked, which can result in an overdose in patients using the device. They have reported that although these pumps were vulnerable, the risk of hackers entering the pump data was very low.

However low it might be, this is an extremely frightening prospect. We have enough worries when it comes to managing our condition. This is just another extra burden to carry. I have a great deal of trust in my pump but to my diabetic friends who are users of the One Touch Ping, I can imagine that this will affect their relationship they have with their pump. Being able to rely on it as you once did before will be difficult. Yes, the risk is low, but the fact that a risk even exists is extremely unnerving.  

Johnson and Johnson said, “It would require technical expertise, sophisticated equipment, and proximity to the pump” before the pump could be accessed.

As this pump is only produced in the United States and Canada, all patients using this pump were contacted on the 27th September 2016 and warned of these possible risks.

The One Touch Ping works via a Wi-Fi remote and enables diabetic users to administer insulin without having to take out the pump from underneath their clothing.

Johnson and Johnson have also said, “That the pump was not connected to the internet or any external network.” 

A diabetic and researcher with a cyber security firm Rapid 7 said, “He had discovered it could be hacked from a distance of 25 feet. Communication between the insulin pump and its radio frequency remote could be hijacked- in theory allowing a hacker to administer unauthorised injections.”

Whhhhhhhat!!

Although Johnson and Johnson had confirmed these findings, they still insisted that the pump was safe to use. They also stated that concerned patients “could take precautions, such as not using the pump’s remote and programming the device to limit its maximum dose.”

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This report was a few weeks ago now so,  what are your thoughts on this finding?  Existing users, what precautions have you taken since this information has come to light? Please feel free to share?

Amina xx

The beeping D ……

As you may know I recently started a sensor trial, which started off really well. I got my sensor fitted everything was running smoothly until I decided I was going to go to the supermarket.

First supermarket trip

The moment, I stepped into the supermarket doors.

BEEP, BEEP, BEEP, BEEP, BEEP! (Anti-theft alarm)

Of course I totally ignored it and kept walking, there were so many people going in and out of the supermarket.

Major Side note: I was coming into the supermarket and in any case it’s not in my nature to shop lift.

I continued with my shopping, arrived at the till, paid for my goods and went through another set of alarms (WHICH WENT OFF).  I looked around because, that surely was not me! So I kept on walking. I reached the exit and walked through the doors with a herd of other people (YES the alarm went off again)! Still oblivious I continued to walk towards the car and go home.

“Wow those alarms were going off a lot. I wonder why?”

My second supermarket trip

Off I go to the supermarket nice and early to pick up a few things.

Side note: I love going to the supermarket nice and early. Its empty and I can just pop in and pop out. Job Done!

I reached the entrance and BEEP, BEEP, BEEP, BEEP!  OK I was the only one walking through, was that me? The guard just nodded and smiled so I smiled back and continued walking in. Shopping done and paid for. I approached the first alarm, BEEP, BEEP, and BEEP! No that was definitely me that time. I decided to turn around and go back to the lady at the till to make sure there were no tags in my bag. The lady checks and finds no tags. She encourages me to just go through. BEEP, BEEP, BEEP! That now confirmed that it was me beeping.

So embarrassing! I had a feeling that perhaps it was something to do with my sensor. I was totally dreading going through the exit alarms so I decide to let the guard know I was wearing a sensor and it might possibly go off as I go through the alarm. I showed him my receipt and my pump just in case he didn’t believe me. Off I went!

BEEP BEEP BEEP BEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEP!

I continued to use the sensor but I just felt that whenever I tested my BGL it wasn’t even close to the numbers on my pump. After 12 days the sensor totally failed and produced an error message that read ERROR 0.

sensor fail

After 5 hours the sensor remained like this so I decided to call Animas (they are so helpful) and I ended up having a lengthy conversation with them. The lady I spoke to asked me several question and tried to get the sensor running again. However she finally said, that the sensor had failed and that I should remove it all together. When I removed the sensor it was bent and had barely pierced my skin. I also mentioned my beeping every time I went through the supermarket alarm. She said that it’s possible that the transmitter may have been faulty. I gave her the codes on both the sensor and transmitter and I was sent new replacements the following day.

I then restarted my sensor trial and I’m now on day 5, no errors or false readings. My BGLs have been spot on when I cross reference them with my BGL on my BG meter. I’m starting to see a clearer picture of what my BGLs are doing and have been able to make adjustments in my basal rates. It still needs some fine tuning but I feel I’m finally starting to iron out all the lows.

Has this (the beeping) ever happened to anyone else? Or have you ever had a faulty transmitter or sensor in general?

 

Amina xx

Get creative with Diabetes

Since, I didn’t get a chance to join in on the Diabetes blog week. I wanted to post this creative piece, which I had already prepared a while ago.

The moment I realised,

I RUN ON INSULIN

The Bond

Where would I be, without my insulin pump?

My constant supply, my night and day.

My everything, my all, the strength by my side.

My companion and I, we struggle, we stride, yet we continue to survive.

You who I can depend on, I will defend you, always on your side.

You endure, my highs, my lows, with no word, no sighs.

You are forever committed to me, for as long as I stay devoted to you.

What would life be, without your endless support?

Every day a new challenge, we fight, we fall, yet we’re still standing tall.

Oh How I envy you sometimes, looking all so poised and refine.

Memory takes me back, to when me and mine would work just fine.

Connected we will stay, till the end of my days

Me and my insulin pump.

By Sugar High Sugar Low