Category: Prediabetes

Non- diabetic but you’re affected by Hypoglycaemia!!

I deal with hypos on weekly basis. Hypoglycaemia and diabetes go hand in hand. These attacks occur when blood glucose levels are too low. For me, this usually happens when I’ve taken too much insulin, not eaten enough food, eaten too late or depending on the type of exercise I choose to do that day. For example, cardio or HIIT (high-intensity interval training) all cause my blood glucose level to drop.

However, non -diabetic hypoglycaemia is a very rare condition which affects individuals who aren’t suffering from diabetes. These individual’s experience hypoglycaemic episodes resulting in the same symptoms that a person with diabetes would experience.

So what are some of the symptoms one can experience?

Some of these symptoms include:

  • Feeling weak
  • hungry
  • Breaking out into cold sweats
  • Feeling anxious
  • Dizzy
  • irritable
  • confused
  • Difficulty being able to articulate
  • Feeling shaky
  • Nervous

My first encounter with this condition was during my final year of University. I met a veterinarian surgeon in the USA and at first, I thought that she was diabetic just like me. She always carried glucotabs with her and was always ready with a snack. She used words that I always found myself saying when my sugar drops such as,

“my sugar is dropping”, or “my sugar is low”.

So I just presumed that she was diabetic too. I proceeded to ask her if she was diabetic too? But to my surprise, she told me that she wasn’t diabetic and in fact, she was a non-reactive hypoglycaemic.

A non-diabetic individual can experience two types of hypoglycaemia:

  • Reactive hypoglycaemia which happens a few hours after consuming food
  • Fasting hypoglycaemia ( which occurs before the consumption of any food)

Potential causes of Reactive Hypoglycaemia:

  • The presence of Prediabetes or a family history of diabetes.
  • A deficiency in enzymes which make it difficult for the body to break down foods you consume.
  • Other possible reasons are some types of stomach surgeries, which makes food pass into the small intestines rapidly.

Potential causes of Fasting Hypoglycaemia:

  • Over indulgence in Alcohol (especially binge drinking)
  • Illnesses which affect the heart, liver or kidneys
  • Low levels of hormones such as growth hormone, glucagon, cortisol and epinephrine.
  • The presence of pancreatic tumours that are capable of producing insulin or similar hormones which have the effect of lowering blood glucose levels.
  • Medication such as antibiotics, quinine (used to treat Malaria), pentamidine (used to treat Pneumonia) and also pain suppressants can all effect the body’s ability to regulate insulin release into the blood.

How do people manage their non-diabetic hypoglycaemia? 

Take a look at these video by youtube vlogger : blogsoidontforget as she goes through the ins and outs of living and managing the condition.

Treatment for non-diabetic hypoglycaemia really depends on what the cause may be. Seek advice from your doctor, take note when you experience these episodes and also how you feel during those times.

 

Amina xx

Knowing the signs for Prediabetes

Prediabetes, as it is known, is a condition which occurs before the onset of Type 2 diabetes. This condition causes a slight elevation in blood glucose levels. The normal blood glucose range for a person without diabetes tend to be between (4mmol/l – 7mmol/l). With prediabetes the blood glucose levels are slightly higher than the “norm” but not high enough for the individual to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

Even having a slightly higher blood glucose level can put you at risk of developing and being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

So how do you know if you’re at risk?

If you think you are suffering from prediabetes be sure to take note of the way you might be feeling. However, some people have no symptoms whatsoever.

These symptoms could include:

prediabetes

According to the International Diabetes Federations (IDF), the prevalence of diabetes in adults between the ages of 20 and 79 worldwide for 2015 was 415 million and by 2040 is expected to increase to 642 million. The World Health Organisation (WHO), have also projected that “the prevalence of prediabetes is increasing worldwide and it is projected that >470 million people will have prediabetes in 2030”.

Click here to find out if you may be at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

If you suspect that you may be having some of these symptom’s listed above, then please go to your doctor.  To determine whether or not you may be suffering from borderline diabetes, the doctor will perform either:

  • Fasting Glucose Tolerance Test – can be carried out for 1 hours, 2 hours or 3 hours. It is done to measure how well the cells in the body are able to absorb glucose (sugar) after an individual has consumed something sugary. A fasting blood glucose level (no food before examination) is taken and HbA1c is measured to determine what type of diabetes the individual may have.
  • HbA1c test – gives you an average blood glucose reading determined over a few months. HbA1c result between, 5.7% – 6.4 % indicates prediabetes. To learn more about the HbA1c test click here.
  • Oral glucose tolerance test can also be performed but individual must drink a sugary drink. Their blood glucose level is tested before and after the drink. Also, the individuals are asked not to eat or drink for at least 8 -12 hours before the test. The individual’s blood glucose is tested and then they must drink the glucose drink. Their blood glucose is then measured every 30 minutes for up to 2 hours.

Someone who doesn’t have diabetes could start with a blood glucose reading of 6mmol/l and after the test could have a blood glucose of under 7.8 mmol/l

Someone who may have Prediabetes could start with a blood glucose level of 6mmol – 7mmol/l and by the end of the test could have a blood glucose level of 7.9mmol to 11mmol/l.

Some who has diabetes could start blood glucose levels start at over 7mmol/l and could finish at over 11mmol/l.

All these tests will give a clear indication as to whether or not the individual may or may not be suffering from prediabetes. In the worst case scenario, even if you receive a diagnosis of prediabetes, then there are many steps that can be taken to prevent the onset of Type 2 diabetes. The video below outlines a few of those steps that one must take in order to avoid the progression of Type 2 diabetes.

Just remember, it isn’t the end of the world, just because you have been diagnosed with prediabetes. It is an opportunity to make changes to your life. By taking small steps you will improve your life and delay or avoid Type 2 diabetes. Don’t  let it bog you down, put in the best effort you can and strive to make a healthier better you. You can do it! As someone who suffers from diabetes, if I had the opportunity to prevent my diabetes occurring I would take every step possible to stay away from it. This is your chance, make it count!!

 

Amina xx 

 

 

 

 

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